Legoing across Nebraska and Iowa

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We crammed in a quick stop to the Denver Lego Store before we left the majestic mountains behind. I wish we would have had a month to explore Colorado. Although we were exceedingly grateful for them, those 3 days were unbelievably jam-packed and much too short.

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3 personalized minifigures and 2 cups of assorted bricks occupied Christian and Rebecca across the wiiiiiiiiide states of Nebraska and Iowa.

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3.9.11 & 3.10.11

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I-70 roadcut

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These rock layers were exposed in 1971 as I-70 was constructed west of Denver.

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Christian studied rock layers in his Apologia General Science course just a few months earlier. This short detour, just 1.5 miles north of the exposed dinosaur tracks, was an excellent reinforcement of textbook geology.

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Another free way to enjoy God’s amazing creation!

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These photos were taken from the Hogback Geologic Trail T Rex Parking Lot at the junction of I-70 & US-40.

3.8.11

Dinosaur Ridge

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My dear bloggy friend, Kristine, recommended Dinosaur Ridge in her personalized Colorado travel brochure for geeky homeschoolers:)

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Dinosaur Ridge is located 14 miles west of downtown Denver. Our visit cost nothing, but there are fees for entering the visitor center and/or riding the shuttle bus.

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Glorious sun finally began to shine as we walked up the trail.

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These were hills/mountains parallel to Dinosaur Ridge.

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What is the historical significance of this site? – In 1937 the City and County of Denver built Alameda Parkway as the main route to Red Rocks Park. The construction exposed dinosaur tracks, but for many years geologists and members of the public observed them without studying them in detail. In 1983, the area now named as Dinosaur Ridge was designated as a National Landmark to preserve its fossil bones and tracks.

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Today, after an expansion of the main site in 1994, over 300 tracks have been identified. Of those at least half are periodically colored using charcoal by Dinosaur Ridge volunteers to help visitors see the tracks in the sandstone.

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Of course, Christian and Rebecca wished that they had been allowed to climb the rock face.

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Bars and fences protected the prints from their trampling, however.

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I should have snapped close-up photographs of the small signs identifying which dinosaurs created which prints. Oops.

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We were in the shadow of the ridge, and the weather was still quite chilly.

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Time to hike back down to the vehicle.

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The Lego store isn’t far away!!!

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Thanks, Kristine, for your recommendation!

3.8.11

Note: We enjoyed our short, free visit. By hiking the trail ourselves instead of utilizing the visitor’s center and shuttle bus tour, we avoided most of the evolutionary assumptions which appear prominent in Dinosaur Ridge materials. We brought along several dinosaur books from home to help us focus on our Lord’s creation of the dinosaurs instead:)