Cade’s Cove

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Our family spent nearly 3 hours within the Cade’s Cove portion of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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Although it’s just an 11-mile loop by automobile, don’t be fooled into thinking it’s a quick scenic jaunt. We visited on the 1st Wednesday afternoon in June, relatively early in “summer vacation” terms, but it was full of tourists. Long lines of slowly-moving and often stationary automobiles blocked the path.

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When we were barely inching along, I snapped scenes through the Pacifica roof.

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Luckily, Christian had brought along a book to occupy himself when we were stuck in traffic for long stretches at a time.

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We noticed several deer on the tour. Sure, we often see those back in Michigan, but…

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these deer pictures have mountain backdrops:)

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We saw trees with built-in camo.

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During a particularly lengthy traffic jam, other tourists were exclaiming and pointing in this direction. We couldn’t really see anything but perhaps a blur. I zoomed my camera lens as far as possible, leaned across Terry, and snapped a series of photos through the driver’s side window. I was frustrated, thinking that I’d missed the wildlife. Back home, when I examined my photos, I discovered this black bear!

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Using my photo software, I cropped the photo and zoomed in to find this more definitive bear-shape.

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The same picture, zoomed and cropped once more. I think I recognize ears!

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About 7 minutes later when the line of automobiles inched around the next curve, people were once again pointing and peering, but I couldn’t identify anything. I aimed the camera in that direction and again snapped blindly across poor Terry, still frustrated that I was missing out. However, another black blur appeared on my computer screen back home!

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Zoomed with my photo software.

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Cropped and zoomed again. Is this bear gnawing on a stump?

I’m so glad I persevered in camera-clicking even though my poor vision couldn’t see the bear! We have more of Cade’s Cove to show you. Stay tuned for more of God’s fascinating creation!

6.5.13
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Cade’s Cove, TN

P.S.

The National Park Service advertises this area as Cades Cove. I’m often curious how places came to be named, so I read the 31-page informational booklet we purchased for $1 near the entrance to this segment of the park. Despite writing an entire section regarding “The Story of Cades Cove,” the author mentions nothing about the origin of the place’s name. Nevertheless, I suspected that an absent apostrophe was involved and resolved to research further once we were home.

I discovered the following website, which suggests that the name ought truly to be Cade’s Cove, indicating that Cherokee Chief Cade was in possession of this cove. However, the website not only omits the essential apostrophe in the place name, oddly proceeds to use an apostrophe correctly within the sentence, but irks me in yet another fashion by slaughtering the plural “Smokies” in its website name. Argh.

Cades Cove:  Though the origin of the cove’s name is disputed, most believe it was named for Cherokee Chief Cade (or Kade), who once claimed the land.

HikingintheSmokys.com

Anyway, this blogpost continues my ongoing battle [see here, here, and here] against apostrophe omission. I previously resisted editorial comment when I blogged about Clingman’s Dome, ridiculously perpetuated as Clingmans Dome according to the NPS, but today I could no longer suffer in silence. Our federal government and advertisers across the globe insist upon either removing apostrophes or perpetuating their negligent absence. Is it ignorance? Laziness? Sigh.

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